“Within you, there is a stillness and a a sanctuary to which you can retreat at any time and be yourself.” – Herman Hesse

Research on Gratitude

Two psychologists, Dr. Robert A. Emmons of the University of California, Davis, and Dr. Michael E. McCullough of the University of Miami, have done much of the research on gratitude. In one study, they asked all participants to write a few sentences each week, focusing on particular topics.

One group wrote about things they were grateful for that had occurred during the week. A second group wrote about daily irritations or things that had displeased them, and the third wrote about events that had affected them (with no emphasis on them being positive or negative). After 10 weeks, those who wrote about gratitude were more optimistic and felt better about their lives. Surprisingly, they also exercised more and had fewer visits to physicians than those who focused on sources of aggravation.

Another leading researcher in this field, Dr. Martin E. P. Seligman, a psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, tested the impact of various positive psychology interventions on 411 people, each compared with a control assignment of writing about early memories. When their week’s assignment was to write and personally deliver a letter of gratitude to someone who had never been properly thanked for his or her kindness, participants immediately exhibited a huge increase in happiness scores. This impact was greater than that from any other intervention, with benefits lasting for a month.

Of course, studies such as this one cannot prove cause and effect. But most of the studies published on this topic support an association between gratitude and an individual’s well-being.

The one thing all humans have in common is that each of us wants to be happy, says Brother David Steindl-Rast, a monk and interfaith scholar. And happiness, he suggests, is born from gratitude. An inspiring lesson in slowing down, looking where you’re going, and above all, being grateful.

Stress Busters.

-Exercise
-Meditation
-Supplements
-Reduce Caffeine
-Journal
-Socialise
-Implement Personal Boundaries
-Avoid Procrastination
-Yoga
-Mindfulness
-Deep Breathing
-Clean up your diet
-See a therapist
-Get outdoors
-Practice a hobby

Budapest 2

Approach your thoughts and feelings like you’re surfing on a wave. Turn your awareness to the warning signs of a negative feeling like worry, anxiety, or anger approaching.Imagine the negative emotion coming at you like a wave that gets bigger and bigger as it approaches, crests as it reaches you, and falls as it moves away.Imagine riding that wave as it passes, and let the negative emotion go with it. Make sure to celebrate your ability to let the emotion go, but acknowledge that more will come eventually and remember to “ride the wave” again when they do (The Mindful Word, 2012).

We just live in our “happy place” all the time? According to psychologist Katarina Blom, the brain is not always on your side when it comes to well-being. Survival, absolutely. The rest, not so much. But there is hope! In this personal and inspiring talk, Katarina Blom lets you in on a few secrets of the mind – and how you can cultivate happiness by befriending your brain. Katarina Blom is a psychologist, a co-founder of a gym for the mind, the first author to publish a Swedish book on positive psychology, and she is the creator of one of the biggest digital platforms on psychology in Sweden. Also, she is an Acroyoga instructor. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

Gratitude is the fairest blossom which springs from the soul.” – Henry Ward Beecher.

 

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